Nursery2

A Childs Cupboard.

It is not every mother who recognises the wisdom of providing for each child some definate place where his own belongings may be kept. If each child can have his own room, that, of course  is ideal. The next best thing is to have some one article of furniture, a cupboard, chest  of drawers, or set of shelves , as the child’s  very own. The right of absolute  ownership invests  the  child  with a  dignity which is worth  much truble to secure.

Let The Children Paste Pictures.

Tack a piece of white oilcloth on the wall where the kiddies can reach it easily. Let them cut out pictures and paste them on the oilcloth.  When they get tired  of the  pictures, wash them off  with a  cloth  and warm  water. Then the picture board is ready for another set of pictures. Perhaps they will cut out a picture of a barn and paste it near the top of the board, and then all around it they may paste animals of all kinds, chickens etc. Soon you will find them displaying much ingenuity in arranging different pictures.

Making High Chairs Safe.

There is always a danger of children rocking their high chair  over when in it, or pulling it over on top of them when learning to walk. Try this safeguard. Put an ordinary screen-door hook on the back of the high chair and a screw eye in the woodwork in each room where you usually put the baby. The chair can be hooked to the wall in this way and there will be no danger of it being toppled over.

Individual Towels and Face Cloths For Children.

One is often confronted with the problem of keeping the bathroom neat without spending too much valuable time in performing the duty. Sometimes it seems a hopeless task with a number of children to throw towels down and only one pair of hands to pick them up. Try giving the little ones towels and a face cloth of a special colour; they will take a pride in putting them in their proper places. The appearance of the bathroom will be greatly improved as to neatness and the towels will not become so badly soiled.

Baby’s Shoes.

The soles of babys first  toddling shoes are often made of suede and this when baby begins to walk, gets smooth and slippery, which means tumbles. Rub the little soles frequently with coarse sandpaper to make them smooth.

(Published in The Good Housekeeping Dictionary of Facts, 1934.)