Keep and Share.

Keepshare

Part of what is so wonderful about the internet is that it marks, to my mind at least, the herald of a new generation of trust in each other.  We  are willing to send money over the internet to virtual strangers for goods we can neither see, nor touch. We join virtual swaps and take faith in the fact that our swap partner will indeed repay our kindness. We form deep and lasting relationships with people we have never met, share our deepest secrets, and look to them for advice. We trust people and for the most part they do not let us down.

Keep and Share is a prime example. A beautiful knitwear site offering above all else to trust us: to allow us to take beautiful clothes like the cardigan below home,  see if it fits our lifestyle, keep it for a week and then choose to keep it forever and let it become "the old friend", the designer Amy Twigger want's it to be, or to send it back...

"Would you like to borrow a garment for a short period to see how it would fit into your life? Try something out at a wedding, or a night out or even just a night in to see if it works for you?  Request an item and we will loan it to you for a week.  You don't even have to wash it before  sending it back.  How nice are we?" 

Cardi

Now is that a beautiful idea or what? An idea perhaps safeguarded by the fact that all of Amy's designs are so achingly desirable and that the business is supported by a few services that mark it out as dedicated both to it's customer and more importantly to it's designs, including the borrowing scheme, laundry service ("Hate hand washing. send it to us and we'll do the work for you") personal commissions and the suggestion of  a bartering scheme that could make the question of affordability obsolete...

Nice isn't the word.