BrocanteHome Cinema...

Celeste-And-Jesse-Forever This post has to start with an apology. Recently I received an email asking me to write a list of films in my Netflix queue, and I thought, well that sounds like a wonderful idea, and then accidentally deleted the email concerned, because I am a space cadet in a polka dot pinny. So this is for that lady, and for anyone else who wants to know what it is I do when all that darn housekeeping is done...

I watch films all the time. Though my Mum is mildly appalled that I spend so much time in a cinematic wonderland, I like nothing better than settling down with a plate of kale chips and losing my mind to someone elses...

Ok, so how about we make this a regular series? I will share what I have been watching and what I plan to watch over the following month and you can throw in your two-penneth, grab some inspiration and tell me when my mildly berserk taste in films has gone too far...

My favorite film last month...

 

 

 

Celeste and Jesse Forever...

Oh how I loved this. It tells the story of a couple who have broken up but can't quite break up and it is charming and true and a testimony to the power of love and friendship after divorce.

 

And on my list this month?

On Netflix...

 

 

Quartet. (I have seen it, but it is so lovely I might just watch it again...)

"A trio of retired opera singers' annual celebration of Verdi's birthday sours when their estranged fourth member shows up but refuses to sing..."

 

 

His & Hers

Director Ken Wardrop enlists 70 Irish women to tell the tale of a lifelong love affair, capturing the unique way men and women interact over time.

 

 

Melancholia

"This inventive drama charts the disintegrating relationship between two sisters, just as Earth hurtles toward collision with another planet..."

 

On Snag Films...

 

 

The Culinary Browns

"The Brown’s, my great-grandparents, published dozen’s of cookbooks from the 1930’s to the 1950’s while simultaneously publishing an expatriate magazine from Brazil and several volumes of Bob’s experimental poetry. This short paragraph only hints at the intellectual bohemianism of their world—they lived in Paris, Greenwich Village and Brazil, they traveled the Amazon by raft, they knew Peggy Guggenheim and Gertrude Stein—and they wrote cookbooks.  Yet, most of this history remains buried under layers of familial discomfort: a legacy of alcoholism and depression, a pattern of distant fathers, and a memory of words stored in boxes..."

 

 

Penny Serenade.

Because I do believe I have never seen it...

"A young couple falls in love while on a trip to Japan, but face tragedy when an earthquake causes June (Irene Dunne) to lose the baby she is carrying. When she and Roger (Cary Grant) return to San Francisco, they consider adoption as an antidote to their now-struggling marriage. Meanwhile, June’s favorite records seem to unfailingly chronicle her life throughout this warmly-entertaining drama."

 

And on Curzon Home Cinema...

 

 

What Maisie Knew

"David Siegel and Scott McGehee’s excellent take on Henry James’ novel shows us life through the eyes of a young girl who witnesses the implosion of her parents’ marriage, the fissures that appear in their subsequent relationships and the narcissism that lies at the heart of their every decision. Appearing in every scene, Onata Aprile is stunning as the irrepressible Maisie, as are Steve Coogan and Julianne Moore as her narcissistic parents."

Happy viewing Housekeepers!